Concert Review: Def Leppard and Kiss Rocket Out Loud In Portland

Two of rocks biggest classic acts took to the road just a few days ago and stopped by Portland, OR on the third date of what’s sure to be 42 sold-out performances.

Def Lep stage shot

Def Leppard at Sleep Country Amphitheater

Def Leppard and the now Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inducted Kiss brought hits, loud and a whole lot of people to the Sleep Country Amphitheater on Friday in Ridgefield, WA just outside of Portland, OR for their co-headlining tour that also celebrates the 40th anniversary of the iconic band that wears make-up.

Def Leppard grabbed the stage first after entering to The Who’s “Won’t Get Fooled Again” and playing the ending live before guitarist Phil Collen got things started with “Let It Go.” The British five-some then ripped off three straight singles with “Rocket,” “Animal,” and “Foolin’” before giving a nod to their massive female base with the balled “Love Bites” which was probably the most cellphone videoed of the night.

Joe Elliott and Vivian Cambel

Joe Elliott on Acoustic with Vivian Campbell behind him

After pumping the crowd back up with “Let’s Get Rocked” the band gave drummer Rick Allen a bit of a break as singer Joe Elliott brought out an acoustic guitar, as did Collen and guitarist Vivian Campbell for “Two Steps Behind.” The acoustics continued with another female favorite “Bringin’ on the Heartbreak” but halfway through Allen came back and the electric guitars roared to life for a rousing finish to the song.

Sure, it’s true Elliott no longer can hit the high notes but it’s not as if he’s straining to reach them and cracks out. Instead, he knows his limits and stops there. His lower registered vocals actually give a new dimension to the songs that you’d expect from a live performance anyway. When he’s not wailing, it’s classic Elliott, like on “Photograph” he sounds just fine live. Overall, these veterans of the stage play tight and the interplay between Collen and Campbell is great to watch.

Def Leppard is not known for long blistering solos but instead short and melodic and sometimes more than one solo per song that both guitarists trade off on and even play together. Campbell who is fighting a return of his Hodgkin’s lymphoma, which went into remission last year, played great and showed no ill effects of the disease.

Def Leppard finished their first set before the encore with the instrumental “Switch 625,” another female favorite in “Hysteria,” the all-out “Armageddon It” and of course “Pour Some Sugar on Me” which they nailed. They closed with “Rock of Ages” and “Photograph.”

The band had a pretty stripped down stage set and perhaps that was a result of them “opening” for Kiss but the setlist was a bit slim for an act of their caliber and was little different than their last tour which even they described more or less as a “hits” tour.

Def Leppard thanks the crowd

Yes, all the radio singles were in play but they can get away with some deep album tracks and even newer songs. “Undefeated” is practically brand new – just three years old now – is classic Def Leppard and great live. Left off. No “High and Dry.” The band is also working on a new album set for release next year and is something they could have given a sneak preview of.

The spectacle that is Kiss brought what Def Leppard’s set lacked with an over-the-top, immense stage show featuring booming pyrotechnics, lots of fire, awesome lighting and a gigantic mechanical spider that served as a sometimes stage lifting members of the band above the crowd.

Gene Simmons high above the stage

Kiss started off with “King of the Night Time World” with Paul Stanley on vocals followed by “Deuce” giving Gene Simmons the mic and then the punk-rock sounding “Psycho Circus.”

“War Machine” brought great guitar chords and flames as Simmons spit fire. Audience favorite “Shout It Out Loud” did exactly that and the thumping “Christine Sixteen” kept the energy going. The iconic “Lick It Up” involved a great extended guitar jam that mixed in, once again, The Who’s “Won’t Get Fooled Again” before Simmons’ blood spitting bass solo and his flying venture to a raised platform where he played along with “I Love It Loud.”

Paul Stanley

Paul Stanley plays to the crowd

The ultimate garage band, Kiss doesn’t exactly have the melodies and even affectional music like Def Leppard. It’s heavy one-two punch hitting with straight up hard rock guitar chords. However, “Hide Your Heart” is a well-crafted song and “Let me Go, Rock ‘N Roll” gives a great beat and featured excellent soloing by guitarist Tommy Thayer.

Adding even more to the already crazy antics of the evening, Stanley flew out over the crowd holding on to a pulley and played “Love Gun” on a platform in the middle of the amphitheater. Drummer Eric Singer took over vocal duties for “Black Diamond” as Stanley flew back to the main stage.

Never ones to follow, Kiss sets a new precedence by eschewing the typical encore and instead, as Stanley put it “Why waste time,” the band encored without encoring “Detroit Rock City” and of course the always great “Rock and Roll All Nite” complete with graffiti and an actual “grand finale” of sorts fireworks show and Stanley destroying his guitar on stage.

Def Leppard Setlist: Sleep Country Amphitheater – Portland, OR

  1. Let It Go
  2. Rocket
  3. Animal
  4. Foolin’
  5. Love Bites
  6. Let’s Get Rocked
  7. Two Steps Behind
  8. Bringin’ on the Heartbreak
  9. Switch 625
  10. Hysteria
  11. Armageddon It
  12. Pour Some Sugar on Me
  13. Rock of Ages
  14. Photograph

Kiss Setlist: Sleep Country Amphitheater – Portland, OR

  1. King of the Night Time World
  2. Deuce
  3. Psycho Circus
  4. War Machine
  5. Shout It Out Loud
  6. Christine Sixteen
  7. Lick It Up
  8. I Love It Loud
  9. Hide Your Heart
  10. Let me Go, Rock ‘N Roll
  11. Love Gin
  12. Black Diamond
  13. Detroit Rock City
  14. Rock and Roll All Nite

 

Def Leppard & Kiss at White River Amphitheater – Seattle

 

Similar show as in Portland. Not nearly as many fans. Hundreds of empty seats – so much so that LiveNation offered $10 upgrades for those in the lawn to sit in seats.

 

Def Leppard Setlist: White River Amphitheater – Seattle, WA

  1. Let It Go
  2. Rocket
  3. Animal
  4. Foolin’
  5. Love Bites
  6. Let’s Get Rocked
  7. Two Steps Behind
  8. Bringin’ on the Heartbreak
  9. Switch 625
  10. Hysteria
  11. Armageddon It
  12. Pour Some Sugar on Me
  13. Rock of Ages
  14. Photograph

Kiss Setlist: White River Amphitheater – Seattle, WA

  1. King of the Night Time World
  2. Deuce
  3. Psycho Circus
  4. War Machine
  5. Shout It Out Loud
  6. Christine Sixteen
  7. Lick It Up
  8. I Love It Loud
  9. Hide Your Heart
  10. Let me Go, Rock ‘N Roll
  11. Love Gin
  12. Black Diamond
  13. Detroit Rock City
  14. Rock and Roll All Nite

 

Written By: AndrewT

Profile: Klaus Marten – A One Man Band

If hazy bedroom music is what you’re in the mood for then look no further than Klaus Marten. Hazy bedroom music?

Yes, that’s exactly what this one-man band from Brooklyn, NY composes using little more than guitars, keyboards, a shaker and a tambourine. Mr. Marten records all the music himself and downloads his albums using Soundcloud.com an online platform that allows artists like Marten to share music.

No slouch, Marten has five albums and one EP since he started recording music four years ago. Mostly instrumental, he boasts a number of original collections as well as his take on several more popular bands like U2, Smokey Robinson, the Beatles and the Smashing Pumpkins.

Year started: 2010

Hometown: Cleveland, OH (now in Bushwick, Brooklyn, NY)

Influences: Smashing Pumpkins, Animal Collective, My Bloody Valentine, Brian Wilson, The Ventures, The Beatles, Japancakes, Deerhunter, Dinosaur Jr, Sonic Youth, Van Halen, Hendrix, Sonny Sharrock, and more.

Instruments played: Acoustic and electric guitars, keyboard, shaker, tambourine

Discography:

  • In A Dream (June 2014),
  • Master Tape (January 2014)
  • Take Me With You (September 2013)
  • Satiety (January 2013),
  • September (July 2012),
  • EP (July 2012)

Website: http://klausmarten.bandcamp.com, http://soundcloud.com/klaus-marten

Twitter: twitter.com/klausityklaus
Klaus Marten

  1. Do you play all the instruments or do you have help?

It’s all me!

  1. What’s your process to recording and laying down tracks?

Usually when I record, I will start with like a main rhythm guitar or keyboard part as it may be, but I may also start with percussion if any exists, and if it is essential or appears consistently in the song. From there I will lay down any other rhythm or lead tracks, then usually percussion if I haven’t already, and if there is any bass at all, usually it is last (I am focusing more and more lately on bass and creating decent lines, but it’s not necessarily key to my music as I see it).  Apart from acoustic instruments, everything is recorded line-in, straight into the sound card.

  1. Is being a one-man band your niche or is your ideal goal to get a band started?

I think for a long time I used to really want to be in a band, and I still think it would be a lot of fun, but I feel like at this point I’ve developed such my own sound and my own way of playing and recording and producing that I’m just fine continuing what I do on my own.

In a lot of ways, I think that I work best alone. I appreciate all feedback I get on my music, but I love being able to see my vision through and shape it without compromise.

  1. Right now you’re much like That 1 Guy, who records and tours as a one-man band. Is that a possibility for you?

I honestly don’t know. So much of my music is either a weird collision of leftover and abandoned stems from old projects, or more organic instrumental stuff that is layered over with tons of effects after recording that I feel it would be really difficult to perform. I would have to rethink a lot of what I do to make it work in a live setting.

For that I would probably need more equipment and a lot of help. Or maybe if I played out alone, I would only play the tracks I feel I could most comfortably/feasibly play in a live setting. But I really don’t know; it would be probably a fun challenge, but nerve-wracking as well. I’m very used to the slow and patient process of one-man home recording.

  1. Is playing live in local clubs or even touring with another band something you’re looking into?

It isn’t something I have really looked into. I have a few people in various places who know who I am musically, but I haven’t really established much just here in New York. Plus I can’t even begin to imagine how to translate what I do to a stage setting. I probably could if I spent time on it, but it’s something that has hardly crossed my mind. That said, if someone offered me a live gig, I’d probably be kicking myself if I turned it down, so I would hopefully try to figure it out. But I guess it’s not something I’m actively pursuing at this point.

  1. Hazy bedroom music is about as an original description as you can find – did you go into recording with this in mind or did you “hear” it on playback?

Well I feel like it’s the most succinct way to accurately describe what I do. I guess it’s something I came up with after having recorded a lot of stuff. It describes the shoegazey-atmospheric-reverby-kind of distorted quality my stuff generally has, while also clueing you in that it’s just one guy with a cheap setup doing it all.

  1. You have an interesting sound, an almost soundtrack feel to your music, is composing music for other mediums an option or is the idea of being an artist, producing albums and touring more to your taste?

Thank you! I guess I would like to keep doing what I’m doing now, recording and putting out stuff as I do, and if any opportunities for soundtrack work came along I would be very open to that. Trying to create something for a specific mood, a scene that has already been created, would definitely be something new for me, but a new kind of challenge that I think would excite me.

I’m reminded of Maston, an artist who makes very lush, hauntingly gorgeous, kind of Brian Wilson-esque music (playing everything himself), and who is one of my very favorite contemporary artists. I read in an interview that he only wants to release albums for like a few more years then just work on film scores. It’s fascinating that he obviously works so hard and long to compose and play every instrument on this beautiful music he makes, and pretty much sees it as a means to an end. If I had his gifts, I don’t know if I would ever stop making albums, but I get it.

  1. The internet is obviously a big tool to sharing music, what’s the biggest challenge you’ve found in getting noticed?

I would have to say the biggest challenge is the competition – both the quantity and the quality of other artists out there. I upload a lot of music to Soundcloud and listen to many other artists on there as well, and there are so many artists – thousands that I alone have listened to – spanning any and all genres that would absolutely blow up, or at least achieve a cult following, if they had the means to get their music out there in a bigger way. Some of the music that people are producing just out of their apartments on a laptop is unreal, and that is my most direct competition, for lack of a better word.

  1. You provide some vocals but your music so far is primary instrumental – do you plan on incorporating more vocals or only when you feel it necessitates it?

I starting recording weird little songs on my parents’ computer when I was 14 or 15, and at the time, I wished I could sing. A lot of the stuff I made then was stuff that sounded like backing tracks missing vocals. Out of necessity, over the years I developed as an instrumentalist into making music that stands alone, so at this point I’m pretty comfortable doing what I’m doing.

I may not be the world’s most God-awful singer (not at all to toot my own horn) but I get anxious enough putting my own music out there, let alone adding any sort of vocals. Honestly with the few tracks where you even hear scant traces of any kind of vocal, I get pretty anxious when someone even brings it up.

10. Fill in the blank – In five years you’re _________

Hopefully able to being to really sell some music…if not as a full-time thing, at least as a nice supplement to another job. Some soundtrack work under my belt would be nice too.

Written By: AndrewT

Profile: Vows

Vows is music unlike anything on radio today.

The New Jersey based quartet founded by Jeff Pupa and James Hencken has slowly garnered a loyal following since the band’s debut album Winter’s Grave in 2012. A constant presence in clubs in their home state, as well as New York and Pennsylvania, Vows is widely known as a fans’ band, doing all recording, producing and show scheduling themselves.

Day jobs aside, Vows is a working band juggling the tour circuit while cutting two full length albums and a couple of EPs. Their most recent release in May consisted of two covers, one of which was Marissa Nadler’s “Silvia” which elicited a positive response in the form of Tweet of approval from Ms. Nadler. Just this month, Vows was nominated for artist of the month by Deli’s Magazine.

Don’t expect ripping guitar chords or thumping beats, Vows is meant to be absorbed while transfixed at the view from a high rise or watching the leaves fall on lazy Autumn day. The dreamy, almost soul searching side to alternative rock, Vows makes no apologies for their style – and not just musically.

Vows Band Profile 2

Founders: James Hencken, Jeff Pupa

Year Founded: 2012

Hometown: Neshanic Station, NJ

Influences: Endless Waves, White-outs, False Positives

Current line-up: Jeff Pupa (Vocal, Guitar, Bass), James Hencken (Keyboards, Percussion, Vocals) Sabeel Azam (Guitar, Vocals). Additional touring musicians: Jon Kovacs (Percussion), Scott Soffer (Bass)

Discography:

  • May 2014 – “Silvia / Pictures Of Matchstick Men” – single and B-side (covers)
  • March 2014 – vows, EP
  • March 2014 – 0, EP
  • February 2014 – “Ride This Out / Dream Beat”, single and B-side
  • January 2014 – “Come Over My Way / Be You Again”, single and B-side
  • May 2013 – Stranger Things, full-length
  • April 2012 – Winter’s Grave, full-length

Website: Vowsmusic.com

Vows

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

1. How did Vows get started and where did you come up with the name?

Jeff:  Vows started as an experiment for James and myself to stray away from playing the more folk / acoustic sound we had been doing for a while.  We just wanted a challenge to push ourselves to create a collection of songs that was synth and electric guitar-based, a bit more lucid.

2. Vows is described as indie, dreamy and a little bit of everything in between, was this intentional or did you gravitate towards this more drowsy genre?

James: It was certainly intentional to write more open ended songs that were still strictly structured. We wanted to open up the kind of instruments and sounds and noises and stuff we could fill songs with to reach a new emotional dimension kind of…but we’ve always been really into melody and song-writing. So its usually mostly about trying to write a well crafted song, and then whatever kind of sonic shape it takes on just sort of presents itself.

3. I hear what could be an almost modern approach to music of the 1940s – a nostalgic feel  like for example “Born a Wolf” a bit in style but also sound. First am I wrong, second if I’m right, is this the recording or do you guys have an affinity for older music?

James: Definitely, although it’s probably subconscious. I live in a house that was built in the 40s and I actually have a decades app that I always have on 40s music. Its definitely safe to say that we all have an affinity for older music, but we love tons of new stuff too. I just make what I want to hear, so the kind of stuff we love has definitely manifested itself in the whole process I’m sure.

4. I hear Vows in the next David Lynch project – are movies or TV shows something the band is open to?

Jeff:  This would be awesome, and thanks for that vision.  I’d love to see our music spread to more types of media, whether it be film or art or whatever.  I think it’s the type of sound that you can close your eyes to and hopefully it acts like a portal to bring your mind somewhere else.  I think film would only enhance that effect.

Sabeel: I’ve always liked the idea of doing a score for a movie, especially since it can have a major influence on the overall impact without people even realizing how much the music is affecting them. Of course, it would be cool to have one of our actual songs featured in a show or movie, but the idea of writing a piece solely to accompany the visuals is interesting to me.

Sabeel Azam Press

5. How does the band approach the writing process?

Jeff:  We’ve always taken a separatist approach to our writing.  We all like the comfort / efficiency of writing in our own home studios.  That said, we exchange the majority of our recording ideas back and forth online.  We live in different states right now, and Sabeel, James, and myself are constantly writing and sharing recordings to add up and build on.

Sabeel: I think we would prefer to be able to spend more time writing in person, and it’s something that we’re striving for moving forward, but at the end of the day we’ll always end up writing on our own too. The convenience of digital recording lets you jot down an idea as soon as it hits you. Coupled with file sharing you can have a song fully arranged really quickly with everyone recording at their own convenience– whether it’s early morning or the middle of the night.

6. For a small band like Vows, do you find audiences prefer and appreciate original material even though it might not be familiar or is there a need to mix in well-known covers?

Jeff:  We did a cover of Marissa Nadler’s “Silvia”, which she actually approved and commented on on Twitter – that was a huge highlight for us.  We also did Status Quo’s “Pictures Of Matchstick Men”.  The two are paired as our latest release, and we really only tossed the idea of covers around before that halfheartedly.

Covers are hard to do, in my mind, because from a writing standpoint, I feel like you have to be adding something to it to really make it worthwhile. I think audiences can appreciate the covers a band does if they can hear those influences in their original sound.  There’s no need to attempt something you can’t do well in the hopes it gains some attention.  I’m not against covers, I am just more intrigued when bands stick to their guns and put their own material out first.

Sabeel: I’ve never really considered the thought of doing covers live as Vows mainly because we’ve always been so critical of getting our originals sounding good as a full band that devoting time to rehearsing anything else seems impossible right now. At the shows we’re used to playing I don’t think people expect to hear covers and honestly if a band plays a cover that’s a total outlier from their own set it almost seems like a cheap move to me. If it’s a well known song it’s more interesting to me to integrate your own sonic elements to make the song your own, while keeping the melody/lyrics in tact. But that’s just me…

Vows Band photo

7. You describe yourselves as a Do-It-Yourself type of band, do you still hire a producer do be a second ear and help provide direction?

Jeff:  At the moment, we are pretty die-hard with the way we record.  We’ve never had a producer or a second ear really – the most help we had was on our second album, Stranger Things, where we tracked drums and bass in a friend’s studio.  I personally don’t welcome the idea of a producer with open arms, and I also think that James, Sabs, and myself may be the only 3 people in the universe who can put up with each other when it comes to writing – just because we are so used to it.  It would just have to be a really good fit is all.

Sabeel: I think there’s a certain amount of trust that’s required between an artist and a producer for it to be fruitful. The same way two musicians need to have good chemistry– it’s the same with a producer. They’re just as integral to a great record as the musicians. For that reason, an album could gain interest in my mind solely because it’s done by a producer that I really respect (of which there are plenty).

But for Vows specifically we would only feel comfortable working with someone who understands what we’re going for, and there are plenty of producers who could grasp that just from listening to our albums. So when that opportunity arises I know it can benefit us hugely, but for now we’ll keep refining our own production techniques, which will ultimately help us convey our ideas better to a real producer.

8. Tomorrow a major label calls, do you negotiate terms or would you just be happy with a record contract and dump the DIY approach?  

Jeff:  If a major label called tomorrow that allowed a good amount of freedom in the creative process and input from our end, then yea, I’d definitely sign up.  I think that concept is important to retaining what we’ve become throughout the years, but it’s also what we’ve been working / hoping for.  In other words, I wouldn’t want to sign to a label and just become something else because of that.  We already have some solid releases under our belt, and I wouldn’t want to let that disappear.  Captured Tracks, Sub Pop, Carpark records – something like that would be awesome.

9. You mentioned a desire to tour with a major band. What band would you most like to tour with?

Sabeel: Probably someone like the Flaming Lips, because they seem to have maintained the enthusiasm and creative spark that’s waned for a lot of bands that have been around as long.

James: Definitely the Flaming Lips yeah – I think we always shoot for putting on these big, epic shows, we’ve just been so limited by like equipment and venues. But our dream goal is probably to one day put on a huge, but heart-felt show the way the Lips do. So yeah playing with them would be amazing.

Vows Drummer

10. Now how does that work? Is it relentless calling from you to a major band’s label or would you get a call from a manager asking if you wanted to embark as an opening act for a major tour or something else entirely different?

James: No idea honestly. I’ve been at huge concerts where the tour openers were no-bodies and not very good.. Then others where the openers blew me away. I think you have to know someone or something. That’s one kind of thing I’d like a label for – to be taken more seriously as a capable show rather than a bunch of unorganized dudes that bigger promoters don’t know if they can count on. Or because if it does take relentless calling, we’re just not doing that, you know?

11. Finally, you juggle day jobs what’s it going to take for Vows to become full-time?

Jeff:  I mean, the day job thing is just part of our reality.  I don’t know if we are the type of band that just throws everything aside and jumps into a vehicle and tours.  As much as that’d be amazing, it takes quite a bit of sacrifice in other spectrums.  We’re definitely the most calculated project that I personally know, but that shows in our writing as well.  I think we’re more focused on setting this whole thing up for the long-haul, in the hopes it becomes the day job.

Sabeel: Ultimately, it’s going to require us being able to support ourselves with our music. The archetypal band model seems to be that you scrape by for years, paying your dues before you reach that point of living comfortably as a musician, while having to sacrifice a lot for it initially.

These days, while bands seem to be making less money through record sales, their popularity can escalate so much quicker than it would have in the past, to the point where they’re doing international tours after releasing one record. I’m not saying that’s what we’re expecting but at the moment we’re just building momentum and growing this project until it seems realistic to completely shift gears in our lives.

Written By: AndrewT

Concert Review: Victor Wooten Slaps Some Bass in Portland

Victor Wooten brought his eclectic taste in music to a packed Aladdin Theater on Wednesday night in Portland.

The iconic and arguably finest bassist in music today had a full band as he played a string of jazz, funk, jazzfunk, a little bit of rock and an ounce of gospel into a smorgasbord of songs including pieces from his latest 31-track album The Music Lesson.

In the short first half, about 45 minutes, Wooten’s bass was in fine form but actually overshadowed a bit by his brother Regi Wooten who is equally adept on the guitar and the beautiful vocals of Krystal Peterson who also sang a few numbers from her forth coming album. Peterson brought the smoothest voice you’d ever hear with a range that any pop star today could only dream of having. The giant personality that is Victor Wooten – he beamed a contagious smile all evening thumping along on his bass occasionally showing the audience of things to come.

After an annoyingly long intermission of nearly 40 minutes, keyboardist Karlton Taylor emerged and played Nirvana’s “Smells Like Teen Spirit” on the piano before the rest of the band settled in. The second half featured a bit more jazzy songs, again with Peterson taking the lead on vocals and after 30 minutes Wooten was left alone on stage to do exactly what the majority of the audience was hoping for.

With some help from added sound effects all created using his bass, Wooten spent nearly 20 minutes just playing bass. Sometimes jaw dropping, other times a bit tedious with what seemed like Wooten simply screwing around in a practice room at home, nevertheless he certainly united a room full of bass players or simply made them depressed after displaying what takes even the talented a lifetime of practice to learn.

Wooten’s bass guitar is more a third appendage and his dexterity in filing up and down the fret board is a wonder to watch. His ability to create such dynamic sounds from a bass guitar that sometimes come across like a child simply smashing fingers all over the guitar but then you realize, there’s actually a melody and purpose there.

His version of “Amazing Grace” was a stand-out, he brought emotion with an ode to his daughter in “Ari’s Eyes,” showcased a new recording in “Brooklyn” and “Me and My Bass Guitar” was a blast. During his 20 minute long bass solo he managed to make church bell sounds emanate from his guitar along with a bunch of other sounds no amateur would ever believe came from four strings.

Wooten returned with his band for an encore which for any rocker turned out to be the best part of the evening. The energy was high, the pace was brisk and Wooten slapped his bass like nobody’s business. The absolutely fun “What Did He Say”  the title track from his 1997 album might be repetitive on lyrics but just an awesome dancing beat that got everybody off their seats. The closer “Victa” from 2005’s Soul Circus was short as promised but showcased a great sense of humor.

Wooten’s band proved tight and he certainly surrounds himself with solid musicians. Drummer Derico Watson pounded out a few short solos though he seemed hindered by such a small set but he kept time well for the rest of the band. Brother Wooten took center stage a few times once with an almost psychedelic solo and he and Victor even traded instruments once, though just for a short jam, and the best part was the two held up their corresponding instruments for the other to play and they did it together.

Written By: AndrewT